Eliminating odours to boost sales at the cellar door

Improving the Sustainability of Water Treatment

Eliminating odours to boost sales at the cellar door

Campbell’s Wines is committed to environmentally friendly and sustainable wine-making. Led by Norm Gunstan, operations manager, all processes and management practices aim for smarter, cleaner, more energy efficient methods to reduce the winery’s environmental impact in the making of its internationally acclaimed wines.

Campbell’s Wines was experiencing issues with the Hydrogen Sulfide leading to a less than ideal environment for hosting visitors to the cellar door.

During harvest and peak production times due to the increased quantity of waste water generated in the wine making process, they were struggling with the additional odor affecting the customers at the cellar door as well as neighbors to the evaporation pond, impacting on customer experience potentially affecting cellar door sales.

“Since moving starting the Magnesium Hydroxide injection into the waste pit we no longer have odor issues within the production room or at the Cellar Door. It has made a big difference with the experience that customers have during wine tasting. The other solutions we have tried are simply masking agents.”

The trial saw H2S dropped from as high as 39ppm to 0ppm, and consequently odors at the cellar door, production facility, waste pit and evaporation ponds was almost completely removed.

Campbells’ Wines were very pleased with the results, the simplicity of the solution, easy to run with low maintenance.

 

Innovative technology solutions solving industrial wastewater challenges

Wastewater management across mining, farming, construction and other industries is a challenging problem that can threaten vital waterways, with adverse health and environmental impacts. Ongoing technical innovation is needed to help factories and farms move towards more sustainable wastewater practices.

For example, the recent fish kill in Australia highlights the impact high-nutrient run-off from farms can have when river flows drop due to drought and water management practices. Blue-green algal blooms can quickly form, which deplete the dissolved oxygen and release toxins.

Treating wastewater from industries and farms has a dual potential benefit. Treated water can be recycled to help cut down industries’ fresh water use, and the waste load in wastewater can be converted to biogas and used to produce electricity.

Anaerobic digestion is a natural process that converts organic matter present in wastewater sludge into biogas for electricity, as well as significantly reducing the contaminant load in treated water.

Anaerobic treatment with biogas production is a realistic solution for industrial sites and farms with concentrated wastewater management issues aiming to work sustainability philosophies into their wastewater management strategies.

Treating wastewater with anaerobic processes to produce biogas energy can significantly reduce pollution, and help industries recycle water and cut costs that would otherwise go towards electricity and energy demands. Increasingly, industrial sites are investing in on-site anaerobic cogeneration plants to treat wastewater.

For example, Calix has been involved in improving the performance of three biogas plants connected to palm oil plants in Thailand, converting the wastewater into up to 25% more biogas energy that the palm oil mill then uses to power its operations. This is a major opportunity for sustainable progress in Southeast Asia, which is home to more than 780 palm oil mills.

AMALGAM can increase the quality and quantity of the biogas coming from anaerobic systems, and provide a significant economic boost for food processing plants and water utilities.

Industrial sites that take up smart, sustainable wastewater practices and waste-to-energy technology aren’t just saving money — they’re saving water, local environments and communities.

Solving extreme hydrogen sulphide and odour issues in Southern California

El Centro, a city 100 miles east of San Diego, was experiencing significant issues with odor control in its sewer system, despite many different attempts from different chemical dosing suppliers to resolve the issue.

One particular sewer line, designed to serve the projected population growth around a shopping mall which has not yet eventuated, was too big for the relatively small volume sewer flow. Rotten egg gas (H2S) measurements at some man-holes in the system were exceeding 4000ppm, which is both highly dangerous as well as highly corrosive to the system.

The solution was to methodically dose Magnesium Hydroxide, its concentrated, stabilized suspension of magnesium hydroxide. Despite shipping the product to the US, the product remained stable and ready-to-use.

 

The City of El Centro said

“Magnesium Hydroxide technology has been applied successfully in our Sewer Line 3. The dangerous levels of H2S have been greatly reduced and we now have a safer sewer system. The success of this project lies of course in the product, but also equally in the high level of customer service, sincerity and professionalism practiced by all IER personnel”

 

 

After six weeks of dosing, there was a reduction in H2S levels to around 1,500 ppm, and after twelve weeks a significant flushing of fatty acids was noted, representing the break-up of “fat-bergs” in the system. Odor measurements after this event rapidly decreased to below 100ppm average, with instantaneous readings down to 3ppm.